LINK: “Slack must use cash hoard to find new ways to keep competition at bay”

Slack’s success has always been a bit surprising because it’s facing off against giants like Microsoft, Facebook, Google, Cisco, Salesforce and many others, all gunning for this upstart’s market. In fact, Microsoft is giving Teams away for free to Office 365 customers. You could say it’s hard to compete with free, yet Slack continues to hold its own (and also offers a free version, for the record).

Original: https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/22/slack-must-use-cash-hoard-to-find-new-ways-to-keep-competition-at-bay/

LINK: “Not a technical founder? This is how you build a tech company”

If your aim is to build a company that leverages technology to disrupt and dismantle some archaic experience but you don’t have those skills, then there are 3 things to keep in mind

Original: http://avnipatelthompson.com/2018/08/21/not-a-technical-founder-this-is-how-you-build-a-tech-company/

LINK: “The Future of Software Is No Code”

Today, companies like Quick Base, Mendix, and Zudy are pioneering a similar movement, attempting to transform code into visual interfaces. Much like in the shift from assembly code to FORTRAN, the underlying code is still there, but it can be represented more simply. These low-code/no-code platforms are beginning to disrupt how software powers enterprises.

Original: https://medium.com/s/story/the-future-of-software-is-no-code-7140bd0c30e3

LINK: “Distributed teams are rewriting the rules of office(less) politics”

I wanted to seek out the experience of these companies and ask: does remote work propagate, mitigate, or change the experience of office politics? What tactics are startups using to combat office politics, and are any of them effective?

Original: https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/18/distributed-teams-are-rewriting-the-rules-of-officeless-politics/

LINK: “Technology innovation in government survey”

The objective of the survey was to understand current activity across government in what might be termed new or emerging technologies that are related to digital or information technologies. Loosely defined, these are new technologies that do not currently have a critical mass, but which may have the potential to disrupt industries or generate significant savings.

Original: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/technology-innovation-in-government-survey/technology-innovation-in-government-survey

LINK: “Full stack decision making”

I know that many organisations are still designed around that hierarchy but if your goal is to end up with an organisation that is less silo’d at the same time as being more collaborative, adaptive and flexible it seems sensible to look to the thinking which is designed to support a more sophisticated view of decision making then that of a hierarchy where things get rolled up and then down the hill to get an decision.

Original: http://www.curiouscatherine.info/2018/08/16/full-stack-decision-making/

LINK: “From stand-ups to scrutiny”

Marrying agile habits with traditional local government governance is easier said than done. If we’re not careful, bringing in agile can add another layer of governance, where stand-ups become daily team meetings and show and tells become programme boards and vice versa. It can lead to a hell of a lot of repetition, which in turn means people engaged with traditional governance have short shrift for agile.

Original: https://blog.wearefuturegov.com/from-stand-ups-to-scrutiny-25af61af5bf6

LINK: “Why You Need To Know About Low-Code, Even If You’re Not Responsible For Software Delivery”

Low-code development platforms are emerging as a key strategy to accelerate app delivery to support digital business transformation. And they have the potential to make software development as much as 10 times faster than traditional methods.

Original: https://go.forrester.com/blogs/why-you-need-to-know-about-low-code-even-if-youre-not-responsible-for-software-delivery/